200 Native American Horse Names For a Serene Equine

Native American Horse Names

Native Americans have a rich and interesting history, particularly when it comes to the tight bond they had with their horses. Apart from riding them in battle, Native Americans also relied heavily on their horses for day-to-day tasks and survival. Today, we’re going to have a look at some incredible Native American horse names, all of which were inspired by the Native American language and culture.

If you’re looking to name your horse after a famous Native American, or if you just want to use a Native American name with a specific meaning, the list below will undoubtedly help you in your endeavor. Moreover, I have divided the list into several sections to make it easier to navigate, and I have provided translations for each name so that you may understand its meaning.

Native American Horse Names inspired by famous Natives.

The following list includes some horse name ideas inspired by famous individuals or tribes.

  • Sacajawea – (Shoshone) was a close companion to Meriwether Lewis and William Clark as they explored the United States.
  • Geronimo – Chiricahua Apache leader.
  • Tecumseh – a Shawnee leader. His name translates to”panther in the sky.”
  • Sitting Bull – Hunkpapa Lakota was versed in medicine and the holy arts.
  • Black Hawk –  Sauk tribe war leader.
  • Cochise –  Chiricahua tribe leader. Very famous.
  • Pontiac –  leader of the Ottawan.
  • Red Cloud– (Sioux) famous warrior Oglala Lakota.
  • Squanto – pilgrim guide, interpreter, and member of the Patuxet tribe.
  • Crazy Horse – Lakota Tribe leader.
  • Neolin – Known as the “Delaware Prophet”, he founded a movement during the mid-18th century to reject European goods and a return to the traditional way of life.
  • Spotted Elk – Son of Miniconjou Lakota chief Lone Horn, he was an ally of Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse.
  • Wovoka – Paiute spiritual leader and prophet.
  • Lone Horn – Chief of Minneconjou Teton Lakota Indians.
  • Chief Joseph –  led his people on a 1700 mile trail to escape the US army.
  • Lozen – Sister of Chihenne-Chiricahua Apache chief Vittorio, Lozen was a prominent prophet and warrior against Mexican incursions into the southwest United States.

Native American horse names inspired by nature.

Nature played a very important role in NA culture. They respected it and blended with it. In order to honor certain animals or aspects of nature, they named their children and their equines accordingly.

  • Sheboyan – Place Of Ore
  • Winnipeg – Muddy Waters
  • Spokane – Children Of The Sun
  • Monon – To Carry, Tote
  • Salamonie – Blood Root
  • Cayuga – Starting Place
  • Metea – Kiss Me
  • Kankakee – Swampy Land
  • Waupecony – White Bones
  • Modoc – Enemy
  • Willamette – Running Water
  • Katahdin – Great Mountain
  • Minnihaha – Curling Waterfall
  • Tuxedo – Place Of Bears
  • Kennebec – Long Place Of Water
  • Aroostook – Good River
  • Calumet – Pipe Of Peace
  • Tuskegee – Warriors
  • Atchafalaya – Long River
  • Haiti – Mountainous Country
  • Sheboygan – Stream That Comes From The Ground

Native American horse names inspired by tribes.

Some Native American tribes are well-known, others not so much. Here are a few horse names inspired by some famous ones.

  • Comanche – Snakes
  • Mohegan – Wolf
  • Ute – Dark Skinned
  • Shoshone – Sheep Eaters
  • Shawnee – Southerners
  • Cheyenne – Finger Cutters
  • Osage – Shaved Heads
  • Mohawk – Flesh, Man-Eaters
  • Dakotas – Related People
  • Miami – Cry Of The Crane
  • Seminole – Run Away People
  • Sioux – French for “Cut-Throats”
  • Apache – Elk Horn Fiddlers
  • Arapaho – Mother Of Tribes
  • Menomonee – Wild Rice Eaters
  • Delaware – From Lord De La Warr
  • Cherokee – Cave People
  • Huron – Hair Style
  • Chippewa – “To Pucker Up”
  • Pawnee – Horn People
  • Ottawa – Traders
  • Winnebago – Filthy Water

Female horse names from Native American culture.

  • Aiyana – eternal blossom
  • Aponi – butterfly
  • Catori – spirit
  • Dyani – deer
  • Elu – beautiful
  • Enola – magnolia
  • Halona – happy fortune
  • Istas – snow
  • Kasa – dressed in furs
  • Kateri – Mohawk version of Catherine
  • Kimi – secret
  • Lomasi – pretty flower
  • Maji – leave
  • Mitena – coming moon
  • Na’estse – one
  • Odina – mountain
  • Orenda – magic power
  • Pavati – clear water
  • Sakari – sweet
  • Soyala – time of the winter solstice
  • Tallulah – leaping water
  • Tayen – new moon
  • Tiva – dance
  • Urika – useful
  • Winona – first daughter

For even more Female Horse Names, make sure to visit my separate article right here.

Male & Gender Neutral horse names from Native American culture.

  • Adriel – a symbol of skill
  • Ahanu – he laughs
  • Alo – one who is a spiritual guide
  • Anakin – soldier
  • Calian – warrior of life
  • Dakota – friendly companion
  • Denali – a great one
  • Hopi – peaceful person
  • Jacy – the moon
  • Jalen – flute
  • Kai – willow tree
  • Kele – sparrow
  • Kosumi – fishes for salmon with spear
  • Mato – bear
  • Mika – rabbit
  • Nahele – forest
  • Nodin – wind
  • Nayati – he who wrestles
  • Nova – new
  • Nuka – younger brother
  • Takoda – a friend to everyone
  • Tauri – young eagle
  • Tokala – fox
  • Wayra – gust of wind
  • Wiyot – river name
  • Ameyalli – fountain
  • Awena – sunrise
  • Chardon – sand bar
  • Chetan – hawk
  • Chimalus – bluebird
  • Citali – star
  • Citana – star in the sky
  • Esadowa – wolves
  • Kabecka – twin
  • Kansas – people of the south wind
  • Kanza – wind people
  • Karuk – upriver
  • Kentucky – a land of tomorrow
  • Kimeya – singing throat
  • Kishil – night
  • Meztli – moon
  • Pala – like a guardian
  • Pillan – the god of stormy weather
  • Tarlo – cub of the bear
  • Teneca – one with self-restraint
  • Saloso – the cry of the wild goose
  • Seneca – Indian tribe.

Horse names inspired by Native American deities.

Native Americans believed in countless gods. Below are just some of the best-known deities from their culture. All of their names can be used for horses as well, especially if the equine in question has a particular trait matching the deity’s theme.

  • Ababinili (Chickasaw god)
  • Aguguq (Aleut god)
  • Ahone (Powhatan god)
  • Apistotoke (Blackfoot god)
  • Ataensic (Iroquois goddess)
  • Atius-Tirawa (Pawnee god)
  • Blue Jay (Chinook trickster god)
  • Breathmaker (Seminole god)
  • Caribou Master (Innu god)
  • Chebbeniathan (Arapaho god)
  • Chief Above (Caddo god)
  • Corn Mother (Arikara goddess)
  • Cuaygerri (Achagua god)
  • Ekeko (Andean god)
  • Ewaki (Bakairi goddess)
  • Everywhere Being (Ioway dwarf god)
  • First Maker (Mandan god)
  • Gitchi Manitou (Anishinabe god)
  • Great Spirit (many tribes)
  • Gudatrigakwitl (Wiyot god)
  • Henon (Iroquois god)
  • Hutash (Chumash goddess)
  • Iya (Sioux primordial god)
  • Iriria (Bribri goddess)
  • Isa (Shoshone god)
  • Kami (Bakairi god)
  • Kanati (Cherokee god)
  • Keri (Bakairi god)
  • Kisulkw (Mi’kmaq god)
  • Ketanitowet (Lenape god)
  • Kudo (Bribri god)
  • Kujuli (Wayana god)
  • Kururumany (Arawak Indian god)
  • Kwan (California Indian god)
  • Lone Man (Hidatsa god)
  • Maheo (Cheyenne Indian god)
  • Makonaima (Cariban god)
  • Man’una (Hochunk god)
  • Masaw (Hopi god)
  • Mokat (Cahuilla god)
  • Mopó (Apalai god)
  • Natosi (Blackfoot Indian god)
  • Niottsi (Dene Indian god)
  • Nishanu (Arikara Indian god)
  • Niskam (Mi’kmaq Indian god)
  • Okee (Powhatan Indian god)
  • Old Man Coyote (Crow god)
  • Onatah (Iroquois goddess)
  • Orenda (Iroquois divinity)
  • Pachamama (Inca goddess)
  • Piai (Carib Indian god)
  • Raven (Northwestern Indian god)
  • Raweno (Iroquois god)
  • Sedna (Inuit goddess)
  • Selu (Cherokee goddess)
  • Sibo (Bribri Indian god)
  • Sipakmaat (Cocopa Creator God)
  • Sky-Chief (Carib Indian god)
  • Spider of Heaven (Arapaho Indian god)
  • Tabaldak (Abenaki god)
  • Taronhiawagon (Iroquois Indian god)
  • Tsááyaa (Beaver Indian god)
  • Tumaiyowit (Cahuilla god)
  • Unetlanvhi (Cherokee Indian god)
  • Unknown Woman (Choctaw goddess)
  • Utakké (Carrier god)
  • Wakonda (Omaha god)
  • Wakan Tanka (Sioux god)
  • White Buffalo Woman (Sioux goddess)

Conclusion.

Original American culture is vast, and their tight relationship with horses is unquestionable. Hopefully, the list above has helped you choose a fitting Native American name for your new horse.

Don’t forget to share this list with your fellow equestrians, just in case they need some help or inspiration as well.